Home > Arizona > Humphreys Peak
Humphreys Peak stands at 12,633 feet as the ceiling of Arizona. Roughly 6,000,000 years ago, this ancient volcano stood at 16,000 feet. It stood at this height until a cataclysmic eruption tore away the east face, creating the Inner Basin and Lockett Meadow. Continued years of erosion have lowered the mountain to its current elevation. Humphreys Peak is named in honor of Andrew Humphreys, a 19th-century officer of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Humphreys Peak can be climbed by three main ridges and several different trails—all are 1st and 2nd class routes. At roughly 11,250 feet, the treeline begins and a thick pine forest envelops the base of the mountain. From here, the forest spreads south and east creating the largest Ponderosa Pine Tree forest in the world. Because of its unique, dominating height over the region, Humphreys Peak, and the surrounding mountains, regularly experience strong winter winds and violent summer thunderstorms. Most mountainous terrain in the world experiences similar weather, but Humphreys Peak can catch people off guard because of its gentle, non-threatening surroundings.
HIGHPOINTROUTEACTIVITYDATE
Summit Humphreys/Agassiz Snow Climb 03/21/2005
Summit South Ridge Snow Climb 12/13/2004
Lockett Meadow Meadow Trails Trail Hike 10/7/2004
Humphreys Peak, San Francisco Peaks, Arizona
Humphreys Peak, San Francisco Peaks, Arizona
Humphreys Peak, San Francisco Peaks, Arizona
Humphreys Peak, San Francisco Peaks, Arizona
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